Tivoli’s Lilliputian Military

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THE TIVOLI YOUTH GUARD
As a master of public relations, Carstensen was always looking for new ways to engage the public. The Tivoli Honory Guard or the Tivoli Boys Guard was created in 1844. The guard grew into a cultural icon in Copenhagen and provided a comprehensive musical education for children. Boys and girls participate in the Youth Guard today.

Links

Tivoli Gardens Youth Guard

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Tivoli Gardens

In 1843 the King of Copenhagen granted Georg Cartensen, permission to open Tivoli Gardens. The exotic and elegant gardens were opened to guests for the first time on August 15, 1843. Fairytale write Hans Christian Anderson was among the first visitors and some say this visit inspired him to write his story, “The Nightingale”.

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The stories of Hans Christian Andersen are featured in one of Tivoli’s popular attractions, The Flying Trunk or Den flyvende Kuffert. You may sense a similarity to Disney’s It’s A Small World.

Amusement parks had gotten a reputation of being somewhat seedy, but Tivoli was a clean and orderly park with lush flowers, family friendly rides and a fun festive atmosphere. Art Linkletter visited Tivoli in 1952 with Walt Disney and remembers Walt writing down notes about the gardens, seating, rides, food and all of the details that would inspire Disneyland a decade later.CPH1_-11CPH1_-10CPH1_-31CPH1_-30CPH1_-29Among the Bamboo Garden is the Japanese Pagoda, built in 1900. Originally it was known as The Chinese Tower until 2009, no one knows why the name was changed. Tea and refreshments are available for purchase inside.CPH1_-28In 1874, thousands of electric lights lit up the night in the gardens, There are approx. 2,800 bulbs on The Japanese Pagoda. The Pagoda was the first of the park’s buildings to get LED bulbs. The twinkling light bulbs are often referred to as Tivoli Lights. CPH1_-264The Moorish Palace in Tivoli is home to luxury Hotel Nimb designed by Knud Arne Petersen. In 1909 Wilhelm and Louise Nimb, who had created a restaurant empireOlder Posts in Copenhagen were brought in to manage the restaurant Divan 2, which still exists.CPH1_-19In October 2015 Hotel Nimb was awarded “Hotel of the Year” by Small Luxury Hotels (SLH) from 520 hotels across 82 countries around the world.CPH1_-20

Links

Tivoli Gardens

Nimb Hotel

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”Then one day, when you least expect it, the great adventure finds you.” – Ewan McGregor

I have to admit that I have had some amazing opportunities because of my job. This past few months I have had the most wonderful travel adventure. 10 weeks, 12 countries, 2 oceans, 3 ships and thousands of photos. If you have the chance to travel to Northern Europe I recommend flying Scandinavian Air (SAS). The cabin crew was great, the food was better than I had ever had in the air and FRESH BAKED BREAD! You heard it right, FRESH BAKED BREAD. During both meal services, they pass around hot rolls. There must be a tiny bakery in the back of the plane somewhere. There were a couple of stewards in chef’s coats passing out the meals. Not expected but appreciated.

The only downside of my flight from Newark to Copenhagen was my seat neighbors. I try to book a seat the furthest away from anyone else, this flight happened to be full and my seat was 2 rows from the back of the plane. A young mother and child began hovering around my row while an austere Dane paced the cabin pointing out certain seats. When he finally took his seat next to me, with his wife on the opposite end of the row, the stewardess approached me. She said there was an empty seat further forward in the cabin and would I mind moving. I immediately said yes and then she informed me that the seat was not an aisle as I had been sitting in. I said that’s okay, what’s an 8 hour flight sandwiched in between complete strangers. As she helped me with my carry-on she thanked me and told me that I saved them a lot of trouble from the couple next to me.

As we prepared for landing, she asked me if I was travelling onward or staying in Copenhagen. I said I would be in Copenhagen for a few days and she hurried away as we got ready to land. Once we were on the ground she came back holding a trash bag full of something and handed it to me. Thanking me again, she had assembled a goody bag of wine and beer. That couple must have been real pains in the ass, and who am I to turn down free booze.

This was my third trip to Europe having previously visited Amsterdam, Hamberg, Bremerhaven, London and Cadiz. This time I started out in Copenhagen and then returned for a week’s vacation after work was done.

The first day of any trip, I make a point of getting the lay of the land.  Research, Google Maps, Travel Books, Rick Steves are all part of the planning process. In my opinion, the Hop-On Hop-Off Bus has been a great way to get an overview of the city and plan where I want to visit more in depth during my stay.CPH1_-3     Copenhagen is an incredibly walkable city and has great public transportation. Since buying a car becomes with an 180% tax, most residents walk, ride the bus or bike. My hotel – The Richmond was centrally located right near the train station and Tivoli Gardens. CPH1_-255

CPH1_-214      The weather in June was great, unlike the 90+ temps back home, Copenhagen was very comfortable and cool. The days were long and by long I mean sunrise at 4am and sunset at 11:30pm. I found that most people spoke English very well and everyone was friendly and helpful.

After 8 days in Copenhagen, there was still so much to still see. A return trip is definitely in order.

 

Links:

Richmond Hotel

Scandinavian Air

Hop On Hop Off Bus

Visit Copenhagen

Categories: Copenhagen, Europe, Nyhavn, Photography, Tivoli Gardens, Travel | 2 Comments

Yo Ho, Yo Ho – A Pirate’s Life For Me

Boom (1 of 1)

June 14th – 16th, the seaside city of Cocoa Beach was invaded by pirates. The annual Cocoa Beach Pirate Fest attracts pirates and fans from around the world.

Raquel and her little cannon

Raquel and her little cannon

Demonstrations included period firearms and cannons

A Pirate named Brave

A Pirate named Brave

A pirate encampment allowed guests to see how pirates may have lived off their ships.

Steadfast Steel

Steadfast Steel

The group Steadfast Steel gave demonstrations of swordplay and combat.

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Pearl (1 of 1)

The lovely but deadly, Pearl

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Undead Pirate

Undead Pirate

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Chicago – That Toddlin’ Town

Foyer TouristChicago, Chicago, that toddlin’ town… The city of Chicago has some really unique architectural history. The Cultural Center located near the Loop and Millennium Park. when it was completed in 1897 it served as the city’s central library.

Tourist DomeThe center of the Grand Army of The Republic Memorial hall is a massive Tiffany dome. This massive installation is the world’s largest Tiffany dome and went through a major restoration in 2007.

Library OwlChicago’s Harold Washington Library replaced the Central Library (now the Cultural Center) in 1987. The roof is adorned with 7 Acroteria or archiectural ornaments. On the corners and center can be found large sculptures of Owls, the symbol of the goddess of knowledge, Minerva. This Great Horned Owl sits over the center of the State Street entrance on Printer’s Row.

Peacock JewelersAnother bird hanging around the loop is the majestic peacock. The Jeweler’s CD Peacock store at State St. and Monroe. The House of Peacock was the first retail jewelry store in Chicago and catered to such big names as Mary Todd Lincoln, Marshall Fields and Mick Jagger. Hotel Sconce

Carson Pirie 2One of the coolest facades in Chicago has to be the Carson, Pirie, Scott and Company Building. Built after the great Chicago fire, the Sullivan Center as it is known today, was built as a major retail center. Today, the building hosts a Target on the bottom floors, but the ornamentation is still intact. The ornate floral details are bronze cast iron and were meant to appeal to the female clientele.

Carson Pirie

FaceMetropolitan Capital Bank on the Magnificent Mile features details from the Prairie School of the Arts and Crafts movement, Frank Lloyd Wright once had a studio at Chicago’s Tree Studios artist’s enclave.

Whacker DriveAt one time, the Jeweler’s Building at 35 Whacker Drive was considered the tallest building in the US outside of New York City. Movie fans may recognize the building from Batman Begins and Transformers: Dark of the Moon.

Water WorksThe Chicago Water Tower was one of the few buildings to survive the great fire. It’s tower was built to house a massive pump that would pump water directly form Lake Michigan. Built from Joliet limestone, it stands 154′ tall, Oscar Wilde said it looked like “a castellated monstrosity with pepper boxes stuck all over it.

Gargoyles TribuneThe Chicago Tribune Building completed in 1925 is adorned with gargoyles and grotesques designed by American sculptor Rene Paul Chambellan.

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The Boston Opera House

OperaHouseThe Boston Opera House began it’s life as a Vaudeville Circuit Theatre in the 1920’s. It was designed as a mixture of Italian and French architecture. By the 1960’s it was a movie house until the Opera Company purchased it.

OperaHouse2In 2002, a major renovation occured that involved a rare assembly of old-world craftsmanship and highly-skilled trades went to work restoring sculptural plaster, gold leaf finishes, Carrara marble, paintings and tapestries, grand staircases, chandeliers, walnut and oak paneling. The restoration included replication of historic carpet, seating and silk wall panels. When the historic patterns for the silk wall panels proved too large for modern looms, a loom was custom-built to create the historic pattern.

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Categories: Boston, Oopera House, Opera House, Photography, Photography, Theaters, Theatres, Travel | Leave a comment

Never Again

BoylstonOn Monday April 15th a tragedy like no other befell my beloved Boston. A week later the site of this horrible event is still deathly still, normally the busy center of the city.

Memorial 2Strangers from all over the world gathered to lay momentos and prayers. Boston Strong echoed across the land, even those damn NY Yankees paid us tribute.

NiketownA pile of chalk outside the closed Niketown store, allowed anyone that wanted, to leave a personal message of hope and support.

MemorialOne of the memorials was growing steadily and had to moved to a new location. Every piece of tribute was carefully replaced several blocks away. Stuffed animals, worn out running shows, Marathon medals, flowers, prayers all laid out with perfect respect.

DucklingEven the little ducklings of Boston’s Public Gardens showed their support. Duck You !

Categories: Boston, Marathon, Marathon Bombing, Photography, Terrorism, Travel | Leave a comment

Boston Through A Fisheye

On my recent trip to Boston I decided to give a new lens a try. I made a point of only shooting with my new fisheye and here are some of the results.

BurrageHouse

There are several buildings that have always captured my imagination, I frequently find myself returning year after year and finding new angles. One of these buildings is the Burrage House on Commonweath Ave at Hereford St. This unusual mansion is currently divided into 6 condos, former residents included New England Patriot’s Tom Brady.

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Similar homes werre built on New York’s Fifth Avenue. Modeled after Chenonceaux, a chateau located in the Loire Valley of France. Covered in Gargoyles and Grotesques, it represents the only example of the “chateauesque” style in Boston.

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Walking along the mall at Commonwealth Ave, one encounters a number of sculptures representing some of Boston’s noteworthy citizens. Merdith Bergmann’s The Boston Women’s Memorial features likenesses of Lucy Stone, Phillis Wheatley and Abigail Adams,

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                All along Commonwealth Ave, you can see architecture ranging from the typical Boston Brownstones to the fabulous marble mansions.

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At the end of Commonwealth Ave, heading towards the State House, is the Boston Public Gardens. This public park features the Swan Boats, beautifully manicured lawns and one of my favorite statues.

Duckling

Robert McCloskey’s children’s book, Make Way For Duckings, tells the story of a pair of mallard ducks that raise their family on the Public Gardens Lagoon. Through the years, pranksters have duck napped individual ducklings, only to return them. The story is so popular that a sister to the statues was installed in Russia.  The Boston residents take great in their duckings, each spring they don straw Easter bonnets. And in remembrance of this year’s Marathon bombings, they wear their own Marathon runner’s bibs.

PostOffice

The Post Office in Beacon Hill on Charles Street, is the oldest operating Post Office in the city. This 2 window Post Office is one of the most popular in Boston , due in part to the friendliness of the customers and workers.

ScoreAntiques

Stephen Score Antiques is nestled among 18th and 19th century buildings in the Back Bay. The vivid blue paint and the French Clown standing guard above the sign welcome you to a gallery full of antiques and fine arts. Previous owner, Israel Sack installed many of the period arcitectural details found throughout the gallery. Many were taken from an old mansion in Marblehead.

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Steinert Hall on Boylston Street was built for piano dealers, M Steinert and Sons in 1896. The six story Beaux Arts style building used to feature a concert hall frequented by the elite of Boston’s arts scene.

PartyStore

This unique facade is at 356 Boylston Street and currently houses iParty with a Twist. In a past life, this was the site of a Schrafft’s Restaurant. Schrafft’s was the kind of place you could see an old lady sipping a cocktail at one table, a group of businessmen having lunch and a gaggle of kids enjoying ice cream cones over at the counter. Schrafft’s was closed on Sunday with the exception of this one location, where Sunday church goers needed somewhere to have lunch.

TheBerkeley

The Berkeley on Boyslton Street was built in 1906 and long considered the crown jewel of Boston’s Back Bay. Designed by Désiré Despradelle, a professor of architecture at MIT had been educated at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. The magnificent facade is encased in terra cotta details and panes of glass.

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Eastern State Penitentiary

     Philadelphia’s Eastern State Penitentiary is a former prison that stressed the reformation of it’s inmates over punishment. Prisoners were completely separated from each other and never knew who was in the cell next to them. They lived in complete isolation every day, never seeing another living soul, eating, sleeping, showering and exercising alone. In reality, the guards developed cruel and hideous tortures, to show their dominance over the prison population.

     In 1966, the prison was designated a National Historic Landmark. By then end of it’s life as a prison it had abandoned the solitary concept and prisoners lived as a community until it was abandoned in 1971. One can only imagine what kind of terrors are imbedded in it’s aging walls.

     The old prison has found new life as a movie set. The decaying building has been featured in Terry Gilliam’s TWELVE MONKEYS and in 2008, TRANSFORMERS: REVENGE OF THE FALLEN.

     The possibility of actual ghosts still haunting the prison has led to paranormal investigators conducting numerous explorations of the site. GHOST ADVENTURES, GHOST HUNTERS, MTv’s FEAR and Great Britain’s MOST HAUNTED LIVE have all produced episodes at Eastern State.

The building is in a state of preserved decay. Areas that are less safe for the average tourist are off limits.

     Among the hauntings witnessed are a shadow figure that quickly scoots away when approached and mysterious ghostly faces in Cellblock 4.

In addition to being a historical site, the building is also home to more than a dozen art installations. My favorite one was called GHOST CATS. Amongst the grounds and cells are sculptures of 39 cats, representing the colony of cats that had inhabited the prison since it was abandoned in 1971. Artist, Linda Brenner created the cats out of a clay that will slowly dissolve over time to represent the inevitable decaying of all living things.

     Eastern State had it’s share of celebrity guests during it’s prime. “Slick Willie” Sutton, a bank robber known for over 50 robbieries. One of the unusual inmates was #C-2559, a dog named Pep. The story goes that Pennsylvania Governor Gifford Pinchot was sentenced to Eastern State for murdering his wife’s cherished cat.

Perhaps the most famous or infamous of Eastern State’s residents was Al Capone. He served his first prison term of 8 months, for possession of a concealed weapon, at Eastern State. His cell was quite comfortable compared to the others, he was allowed to decorate it himself with rugs, art and antiques.

Capone was also Eastern State’s most famous paranormal victim. He claimed that he was haunted by the ghost of James Clark, the brother-in-law of Capone’s rival, murdered in the St. Valentine’s Day massacre. Fellow inmates reported hearing Capone screams nightly, begging “Jimmy” to go away and leave him alone.

     Is Eastern State Penitentiary haunted ? I can honestly say that after visiting, you certainly get a feeling of the oppressive isolation and despair felt by the inmates. EVP’s have captured disembodied voices and more than one person has seen ghostly figures in the Guard Tower. At least for a few days a year, Eastern State is definitely haunted and a scary experience is guaranteed.

“Terror Behind The Walls” happens every Halloween. In 2012, the prison will be the host to 6 different haunted experiences. You can check it out at http://www.easternstate.org/halloween/preview

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Boston: City of Angels and Demons

I grew up in and around Boston. I went to Emerson College in Boston and worked for various theatre companies around Boston.

One thing I love to do when I go home for a visit is to walk around the city. I always find something new and unique to photograph.

For a city as old as Boston, it can be magical in broad daylight.

High above Boylston Street, this Angelic face watches the masses of people below.

A winged Lion stands guard over the old Armory.

The Masks of Comedy and Tragedy adorn the Emerson Majestic Theatre. It’s hard to believe that this was once a run down movie house showing martial arts flicks. Now it’s been restored to it’s original glory.

These Gargoyles stare out from their perches high above Wall St.

I imagine that they come to life at night when the city is still and all of us humans have gone to bed.

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